Practicing the King’s Economy

Practicing the King's Economy: Honoring Jesus in How We Work, Earn, Spend, Save, and GivePracticing the King’s Economy: Honoring Jesus in How We Work, Earn, Spend, Save, and Give by Michael Rhodes
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I received a copy of the book for free from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

Practicing the King’s Economy is a book that explores the Biblical concepts of economy through “keys”from Scripture. Each key is assigned a chapter to explain it (using Scripture) and then a follow up chapter with real world application for self, church, and business.

The keys are worship, community, work, equity, creation care, and rest.

This book took a couple weeks to wade through. I recommend no more than one key a day because reading and processing will keep your mind on the chapter beyond the time you finish reading. The authors are humble in their suggestions knowing that how these keys are applied may look different for everyone. The book is encouraging and convicting. You won’t look at life in the western world the same way after finishing it, unless you’ve already gone through a self-examination of how God intended for us to live as a society. If you have, the examples and creative applications are still worth the read.

The authorship of the book (there are three authors) is not confusing – each chapter/key is written by only one, though the keys and stories intertwine.

I was surprised by the depth of the book and by how truly thought provoking it was. I highly recommend it to church and ministry leaders. I know it will inform my own ministry a great deal in the future.

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The Last Battle (review)

The Last Battle (Chronicles of Narnia, #7)The Last Battle by C.S. Lewis
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book is the first book I’ve wished for a “re-read” option on goodreads. because I cannot stress enough how important I think it is for you to know I love it enough to frequently re-read it.

The final volume in the Chronicles of Narnia, we see the Eustace and Jill return to Narnia, only not as they are used to it. Animals are treated like animals – trees cut down without concern for their very real souls (remember it is fantasy). I loved the descriptions of the two worlds (ours and Narnia) and the idea that such a thing could be a reality isn’t so far-fetched as you might think, as Lewis helps us to see God as bigger than we’ve imagined.

The end perfectly captured the poignancy of leaving the earth for an unknown – and in faith in an extraordinary God.

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